Governance > Syllabus > Trinity Western University Undergraduate Course Syllabus Course Number: POLS 234 IR Course Name: Can (All)

Trinity Western University Undergraduate Course Syllabus Course Number: POLS 234 IR Course Name: Canadian Government and Politics in Comparative Perspective Semester and Year: Fall 2020. ORDER ANY ASSIGNEMENT FOR THIS COURSE HERE

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Trinity Western University Undergraduate Course Syllabus Course Number: POLS 234 IR Course Name: Canadian Government and Politics in Comparative Perspective Semester and Year: Fall 2020 Instruc... tor: Dr. Christopher Taucar Contact Information: Telephone: (604) 513-2121 x3107 Email: [email protected] Office Hours: by appointment via Zoom or Electronic Mail Co-requisites or Pre-requisites: None Semester Hours: 3 Sem. Hrs. Fridays 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. (Online) Course Description: This course provides the student with an overview of the Canadian system of government in a comparative approach that includes study of British, American, and Canadian political and government institutions and practices. It offers a comparative study of how basic concepts, principles, and institutions associated with different expressions of liberal-democratic governments highlight the diversity of political experience, reveal the interdependence of political systems, and show the uniqueness of Canada’s political system. Particular attention is given to the manner in which Canada’s Parliament attempts to facilitate and develop public policy that reflects the diverse interests and aspirations of its citizens. Topics to be explored include: the Canadian constitution, political institutions (including parliament, executive, and courts); federalism, financing the federation; the Charter of Rights and Freedoms; parties; and elections. Course Learning Outcomes: 1. To gain a basic understanding of the principles embodied in the Canadian constitutional framework and their impact on governmental institutions. (SLO 1: Knowledge and its Application; SLO 2: Cognitive Complexity) 2. Students will gain in understanding of the historical roots of contemporary Canadian government institutions and practices. (SLO 1: Knowledge and its Application; SLO 2: Cognitive Complexity) 3. Students are strengthened in their ability to use the concepts and skills needed to assess critically the nature and significance of current political issues in Canada. (SLO 2: Cognitive Complexity; SLO 6 Social responsibility and Global Engagement) 4. Students gain practical experience in public speaking through oral and written exercises. 5. Students develop a critical Christian understanding of the Canadian political tradition and the recognition that different worldviews compete for our allegiance and involvement. (SLO 6 Social Responsibility and Global Engagement) Required Texts and Materials: Heather MacIvor, Parameters of Power: Canada’s Political Institutions. Fifth edition. Toronto: Nelson, 2010. Various Readings will be posted to Moodle. Students should consult the tabs for each week to see if additional readings are posted, e.g.: Christopher Edward Taucar, Canadian Federalism and Quebec Sovereignty. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc., 2000 - excerpts A number of books useful to the course, but not required, include: Christopher Edward Taucar, The British System of Government and Its Historical Development. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2014 (available as ebook through the TWU Library). Link: https://ezproxy.student.twu.ca/login?url=https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=e000xna&AN=872556&site=eds-live&scope=site Course Activities/Requirements: Keep this course syllabus handy. It should serve as a reference point throughout the semester. Successful assignments will conform to the guidelines laid out in the syllabus. Classes follow a mixed format, combining lectures with activities of various sorts. These include: brainstorming sessions with the whole class, general class discussion, discussion in small groups, debates, and miscellaneous other activities. Throughout, students will be asked to be active participants in the leaning environment. The class participation mark includes completing the various in-class assignments which are a regular part of the course. Therefore, class attendance is important. Writing summaries in point form of class readings is highly recommended for class participation, and is both good practice and useful for final exam preparation. Note: If due to circumstances beyond your control, such as time zone differences, you are unable to regularly attend zoom classes, please notify your Instructor at the beginning of the term, and class assignments counting for participation will be assigned to you to be completed and emailed to the Instructor at [email protected] by the beginning of class at 1:00 p.m. Also, all online classes are and all assignments, tests, essays, activities, exams, etc are due based on local British Columbia time (Pacific Time). If you reside in another time zone, make sure that you are aware of Pacific Time. Course Evaluation: Short Assignment 5% Mid-Term Test (October 16, 2020) 15% Reading Reflections (3 x 5%) 15% Essay 30% (5% essay statement and bibliography, 25% essay) Final Exam 25% Class Participation and in-class Assignments 10% Course Policies: How to do the Assignments General assignment policies: Follow Instructions. Before undertaking assignments, please consult the specific instructions enumerated below, as well as related instructions given in class. Following instructions is the minimal precondition for effective work. If you are unclear about any instructions, just ask. No do-overs. There will be no ‘do-overs’ or ‘extra credit’ assignments for students who do poorly on course tasks. It is the student’s responsibility to follow instructions and implement them effectively, and to seek help from the instructor where they are unsure, prior to submitting finished work. Only hard copies get graded. Please submit hard copies of all assignments. Cite all the sources you rely on. You are expected to provide proper citation for ALL content (including ideas, facts, arguments, and quotations) that you did not invent. Tell your reader where you found the content in question. Accepted citation styles are MLA or Turabian (Chicago Style). Give page numbers when citing. Assignment specifics: 1. Short Assignment (5%) See Short Assignment Tab on Moodle for specific instructions. Due: October 9, 2020 by the beginning of class at 1:00 p.m. All assignments should be in Word preferably or PDF allowing for comments. Upload your assignments to Moodle under the Home Tab and the corresponding Assignment. If you cannot upload a particular assignment to Moodle, email the assignment to [email protected] You may also email a backup copy. Late Penalty: 10% per day. 2. Reading Reflections (3 Reading Reflections out of 4 possible readings (3 x 5% = 15%). About 2-3 pages, but no more than 3 pages, Times New Roman, 12 point font. All assignments should be in Word preferably or PDF allowing for comments. Upload your assignments to Moodle under the Home Tab and the corresponding Assignment. If you cannot upload a particular assignment to Moodle, email the assignment to [email protected] You should also email a backup copy. Late penalty: -100%. No late reading reflection will be accepted. All readings will be posted online, or emailed to the students, unless it is a course text. It is the student’s responsibility to ensure that they have successfully accessed the readings online or by email, and to bring to the attention of the professor if they have not successfully accessed or received it for any reason. A student may do a reading reflection on any three of the readings. If a fourth reading reflection is done, it will not be marked or counted. These assignments are the student’s own short, written reflections on the readings. They are not only summaries of the reading, although a portion of them must summarize the main argument(s) or outline the debate in order to demonstrate comprehension of the main argument(s) or debate. Students should highlight particularly important points or key questions raised by the readings, and provide their own analysis and reasoned views on the issues. For the Charlton and Barker readings, which consist of two short essays exploring contrary sides of a question, you should write explaining which side of the debate you found more convincing, and why. You are welcome to reject both sides in favour of a different position altogether, but, again, you must give good reasons for your stance. The goal is to demonstrate analysis/critical engagement with the reading. Each reading is due on or before the due date, which is the beginning of class by 1:00 p.m. If for time management or other reasons it is convenient to submit your reading reflection on an earlier date, please feel free to do so. The reflection will still be marked after the due date. Issue 1: Peter Aucoin, ch. 3 “When Conventions Fail: Constitutional Governance without Clear Rules”, in Democratizing the Constitution: Reforming Responsible Government: Reforming Responsible Government. Edmond Montgomery: 2011. Due: September 18, 2020 at the beginning of class by 1:00 p.m. Issue 2: Mark Charlton and Paul Barker, eds., Issue 6: “Is the Prime Minister too Powerful?” - debate between Hugh Mellon and Paul Barker, in Crosscurrents: Editor’s Choice, 7th ed. Toronto: Nelson, 2015. Due: October 2, 2020 at the beginning of class by 1:00 p.m. Issue 3: Mark Charlton and Paul Barker, eds., Issue 9 “Is a Mixed-Member Proportional Electoral System in Canada’s Interest,” in Crosscurrents: Editor’s Choice, 7th ed. Toronto: Nelson, 2015. Due: November 27, 2020 at the beginning of class by 1:00 p.m. Issue 4: Christopher Edward Taucar, ch. 10 “The Process of Constitutional Change in Written Text,” Canadian Federalism and Quebec Sovereignty. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2000. Due: December 4, 2020 at the beginning of class by 1:00 p.m. 3. Essay Statement and Bibliography (5%) Due: October 23, 2020 by the beginning of class at 1:00 p.m. All assignments should be in Word preferably or PDF allowing for comments. Upload your assignments to Moodle under the Home Tab and the corresponding Assignment. If you cannot upload a particular assignment to Moodle, email the assignment to [email protected] You may also email a backup copy. Late penalty: - 100%. No late essay statement and bibliography will be accepted. Assignment description: Submit a one-page, typed sheet providing: 1. your chosen term paper topic, 2. three sentences about what you intend to do with your essay. One sentence will provide a hypothesis, which sets out what you will seek to prove in your essay. Do not worry about it being a final statement. The hypothesis is only to guide your research and writing. It may, and often will, change by the time you finish your essay. The essay statement should strive for clarity and give some direction for what you will be seeking to accomplish, and give some clarity for what you will be seeking to accomplish. A preliminary outline should be provided. 3. Full bibliographical information for 5 scholarly sources that will form the basis of your research for the essay. Your bibliographical entries should follow Turabian (Chicago style), MLA, or APA format. If in doubt, you can use the basic format as follows: For a book: Taucar, Christopher Edward, The British System of Government and its Historical Development. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2014. For an article: Taucar, Christopher Edward, “Judicial Standards of Review of Administrative Bodies: The Consideration of Citizen Participation,” (March 2010) Vol. 53, No. 1 Canadian Public Administration 67. For an online source: Frank Graves, “The Grey Divide: How generational conflict twists our politics.” iPolitics. http://www.ipolitics.ca/2014/12/09the-grey-divide-how-generational-conflict-twists-our- politics/ (Date accessed: May 15, 2015). Your bibliographies will be evaluated according to the degree to which the sources listed are (a) relevant to your essay topic, and (b) academically credible. Bibliographies should largely conform to the Turabian or MLA formats. 4. Argumentative Essay Due: November 27, 2020 by the beginning of class at 1:00 p.m. All assignments should be in Word preferably or PDF allowing for comments. Upload your assignments to Moodle under the Home Tab and the corresponding Assignment. If you cannot upload a particular assignment to Moodle, email the assignment to [email protected] You may also email a backup copy. Late Penalty: -10% per day. If you are granted an extension due to illness, your paper must be submitted with a doctor’s note. Such request for extension must be requested prior to the deadline. Citation style: Turabian (Chicago style), MLA or APA. Give page numbers for all citations. Assignment description: Essays should make an academic argument of 7-8 pages long, and no more than 10 pages, standard margins, double-spaced, 12 point Times New Roman font. Endnotes and Bibliography may be on additional pages. The essay must develop a scholarly argument, demonstrating the ability to draw together ideas from a number of academic sources, and to construct a case based upon a consideration of the relevant evidence. Essays must make good use of at least 5 academic sources other than or in addition to course texts (see ‘Bibliography’, above). For help with term paper writing, attend class, drop by my office hours, and/or consult the Library resources. Essay topics: 1. Overall, has the Charter of Rights been positive or negative in Canada. Has it given too much power to individual judges to influence or shape Canadian politics? Is it anti-democratic? Should the Charter s. 33 (the notwithstanding clause) be used? 2. Do we need electoral reform in Canada or in British Columbia? Discuss electoral reform. 3. In 2015, there was a new party elected to power. Looking back at the previous government, what were the pros and cons of the Conservative government and/or its policies. Discuss, focussing on 1-3 important issues, together with the evidence. Examples of issues might include the Conservative government’s handling of the economy, its foreign policy, etc. [You should not say how you voted. Only make an evaluation of the government.] 4. In 2015, there was a new party elected to power. Looking back at the current government, what were the pros and cons of the Liberal government and/or its policies. Discuss, focussing on 1-3 important issues, together with the evidence. Examples of issues might include the Liberal government’s handling of the economy, fiscal responsibility, electoral system, reform, its foreign policy, etc. [You should not say how you voted. Only make an evaluation of the government.] 5. Do we need Senate reform? If so, what should it be, what are the pros and cons to that reform proposal, and what are the obstacles to change? 6. Would you like to see reforms to the current practices of Canadian parliamentary government and responsible government, for example to make it more democratic, or do you believe the current practices strike a good balance? Discuss both sides of the issue. Also, discuss whether you think individual Members of Parliament should have a greater role and what that greater role might be. A quick note on the structure of term papers: All essays should contain the following elements: 1. An introduction, explaining what the paper sets out to accomplish. All introductions should contain a thesis statement, clearly stating the paper’s argument. Essays not containing a clear thesis statement will face a deduction of 3% out of 25%. The introduction should also quickly summarize the key steps to be made in the argument, offering a ‘blueprint’ of the paper’s structure. 2. A ‘middle’ or body, comprising the bulk of the paper, in which the principal arguments and analysis are made, key terms defined, basic historical and factual background laid out. You should examine various arguments, including counter-arguments, i.e. views running counter to your own - and state why you believe your argument is better overall. 3. A conclusion, in which the basic findings of the essay are reiterated and their significance affirmed. Conclusions are usually fairly short (e.g. a paragraph or two in papers of this length). 4. Citations in the form of endnotes. You must offer citations for all borrowed content. This includes facts, concepts, quotations, and paraphrases. Please give page numbers when citing. Failure to properly cite constitutes plagiarism and will be disciplined according to TWU policy. Students are required to be familiar with what constitutes plagiarism. You MUST use quotation marks when you are borrowing someone’s word-for-word phrasing. In other words: direct borrowings must be indicated as such. 5. A Bibliography page containing all sources cited. Good, clear, coherent writing is an essential part of a successful academic essay, which will be reflected in grades. Say what you mean as simply and directly as you can. Attend to grammar and polish. It might help to bear in mind a few GOLDEN RULES. I. Description should precede analysis. That is, you should define your terms, give the background, and describe the basic facts about the phenomenon at issue, before making your analysis and argument about it. II. It is better to be narrow and thorough than wide-ranging and shallow. Focus on one or two specific problems and deal with them in depth. Don’t feel as though you have to say everything about your topic. III. Make sure your evidence suits your argument and offers the best kind of evidence. For example, if you want to argue that a particular politician is unpopular, cite public opinion data, and not internet blogs or quotations from political rivals. RESOURCES for the term paper: Here are a few websites containing scholarly articles that might offer material: • Institute for Research on Public Policy (IRPP): http://irpp.org. A respected ‘think tank’ in Canada. Click on the ‘Research’ link for a variety of promising downloads. • Policy Options: IRPP’s influential and accessible journal also can make a good starting point for research. Just make sure you are accessing the journal itself rather than its blog. Current and back issues of Policy Options are downloadable at http://policyoptions.irpp.org • C.D. Howe Institute: http://cdhowe.org. Follow the ‘Research’ links to free materials on a range of issues. • The Mowat Centre for Policy Innovation: http://mowatcentre.ca. Ostensibly, Ontario-focussed, but in fact offers work on a range of wider Canadian issues. Follow the ‘Research’ links. • The Fraser Institute: http://www.fraserinstitute.ca. This ‘think tank’ receives more media coverage than all other think tanks in Canada combined according to The Globe and Mail. It has many free documents available. Look for ‘Research Studies’ under the ‘Research and News’ tab. • Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives: http://policyalternatives.ca. Look for ‘Reports and Studies’ under the ‘Publications’ tab. • Canadian Parliamentary Review: http://www.revparl.ca/english/index.asp. Free online journal. Search the Archive and the current issue for interesting papers. Mainly concerned with matters parliamentary and legislative in Canada. CITATIONS IN THE TERM PAPER You are expected to provide citations for all content that you did not invent first. ‘Content’ includes facts, concepts, ideas, direct quotations, paraphrasings, and any other form of borrowing, from any source. Academic Integrity and Avoiding Plagiarism at TWU One of the core values of Trinity Western University is the integration of academic excellence with high standards of personal, moral, and spiritual integrity. The University considers it a serious offence when an individual attempts to gain unearned academic credit. It is the student’s responsibility to be informed about what constitutes academic dishonesty. For details on this, and on identifying and avoiding plagiarism go to the University Homepage > Academics > Academic Calendar (p. 46-49). See also: https://prezi.com/od62fxnkbmxh/plagiarism-how-to-get-it-out-of-your-life/ (Prezi presentation) http://bit.ly/1p00KX3 (Google Slide presentation offering more comprehensive information) Class Cancellation For courses with synchronous delivery times, please note the following: Because of the capacity for online class delivery, no class will be cancelled due to weather conditions or campus closures. For any additional extenuating circumstances that would lead to individual class cancellations, professors will update students via the announcement block on Moodle and/or email. In the event you are in a distant international time zone and unable to meet synchronously, please notify your instructor who will make alternative arrangements for you to engage the content. All official Trinity Western University communications regarding campus-wide updates can be found at twu.ca. University Standard Grading System The Standard Grading System can be found in the Academic Calendar at https://www.twu.ca/academics/academic-calendar (p. 40). Responsible Use of Electronic Devices Because of the online option for class delivery, these are the current requirements for the use of electronic devices. The responsible use of electronic devices (cell phones, tablets, laptops) in class is essential for the entire learning community. Responsible use of electronic devices includes the following: • Set up the necessary devices for class and turn off all sound notifications prior to the start of class. Be mindful of online classroom etiquette, such as muting your own mic when you are not speaking. • Use devices only required for class-related work. Checking social networks or email detracts from your learning experience and that of your classmates. Please show respect to others by checking emails and personal content during breaks only. • Do not film, photograph, or record your classmates or instructor without their prior permission. Inappropriate usage will result in a deduction from a student’s participation grade. Academic Freedom With our charter, mission, and identity as a Christian university, Trinity Western University is committed to academic freedom, affirming and supporting it as defined and described in the statements of Universities Canada and the Tri-Council Research Granting Agencies provided in full at the following link: https://www.twu.ca/academic-freedom-trinity-western-university. Students should familiarize themselves with both the academic freedom statement and policy found at the Academic Freedom website. In this course, the academic freedom of both the course instructor and students is to be respected. Trinity Western University welcomes a diversity of academic perspectives, both in class discussion and submitted course work, provided they are thoughtfully and respectfully presented. Hate speech will not be tolerated. Accessibility Statement Students with a disability who need assistance are encouraged to contact the Centre for Accessible Learning upon admission to TWU to discuss their specific needs. All disabilities must be recently documented by an appropriately certified professional and include the educational impact of the disability along with recommended accommodations. Once documented with the Centre for Accessible Learning, a letter will be sent to the student’s professor recommending appropriate accommodations for an online setting. Within the first two weeks of the semester, students must meet with their professors to agree on accommodations appropriate to each class. Students should follow the steps detailed by the Centre for Accessible Learning outlined on the website at https://www.twu.ca/academics/learning-commons/centre-accessible-learning. Hospitality in the Classroom TWU is committed to an ethic of inclusion centred on the principles of Christian hospitality, reciprocity and reconciliation. We seek to cultivate generous learning spaces that are based on respect for differences and are open to diverse views, opinions, and identities that are thoughtfully expressed in a collegial manner. We welcome and value all voices, including those from under-represented groups or those who have been marginalized. The practice of hospitality also applies to the online classroom environment. TWU Writing Centre The Writing Centre is available to assist all students with their academic writing assignments in any subject at any stage of the writing process, from brainstorming to editing. This is a free service. Online one-on-one coaching sessions are available Monday to Thursday. To make an appointment, visit www1.twu.ca/writingcentre. Additional online writing support is offered through WriteAway. Students can submit up to three drafts of a paper, and the online tutors will provide feedback and resources to help improve the writing. Find out more at https://writeaway.ca/. For more information, visit create.twu.ca/learningcommons or contact [email protected] Privacy and Copyright Statement and Prohibition If recordings, including any oral or written presentations, or transcripts of any class or PowerPoint or other presentations, are made and/or posted in any way, students may not disclose or show or permit to be shown such recording(s) or transcript(s) or both to any person who is not a TWU student outside the class. It is strictly forbidden for any person, be it an individual, corporate or State, who is not a student enrolled in this course, without limiting the generality of the foregoing to read, watch, copy, make a recording, translate, share or disseminate any recording(s) or transcript(s) of the class(es) or any part thereof, without the express written permission of the Instructor. The Instructor reserves all rights in all presentations, questions, and written materials presented, disseminated, posted, or facilitated within the class. Course Outline: I INTRODUCTION TO COURSE AND INTRODUCTION TO CANADIAN POLITICS (September 11) Required Readings Heather MacIvor, Parameters of Power: Canada’s Political Institutions. Fifth edition. Toronto: Nelson, 2010, Chapter 1, pp. 3-16. Recommended: Christopher Edward Taucar, Canadian Federalism and Quebec Sovereignty. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2000, Chapter 1, pp. 11-20. For anyone unfamiliar with basic Canadian history, a short review is provided in Christopher Edward Taucar, Canadian Federalism and Quebec Sovereignty. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2000, Chapter 3. Understanding Canadian history will help you to understand some of the issues that arise in Canadian politics. II CANADA’S CONSTITUTIONAL FOUNDATIONS (September 18 and 25) Heather MacIvor, Parameters of Power: Canada’s Political Institutions. Fifth edition. Toronto: Nelson, 2010, Chapter 3. Students should examine the two main constitution documents (Constitution Act, 1867, and Constitution Act, 1982) found in the appendix to the MacIvor text. It is sufficient to read the headings to be aware of the general content. Specific provisions will be highlighted in the lecture. Reading Reflection: Issue 1: Peter Aucoin, ch. 3 “When Conventions Fail: Constitutional Governance without Clear Rules”, in Democratizing the Constitution: Reforming Responsible Government: Reforming Responsible Government. Edmond Montgomery: 2011. Due: September 18, 2020 at the beginning of class by 1:00 p.m. Recommended: Christopher Edward Taucar, Canadian Federalism and Quebec Sovereignty. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2000, pp. 118-120, Chapter 4, pp. 52-62. “Rebellion and Reform,” Episode 7 of Canada: A People’s History. This is part of a television series which is available on www.youtube.com. This episode runs 1 hour and 45 minutes and is well worth watching as background to the events leading up to the winning of responsible government in Canada. III THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH OF GOVERNMENT: CROWN, PRIME MINISTER, AND CABINET (October 2) Heather MacIvor, Parameters of Power: Canada’s Political Institutions. Fifth edition. Toronto: Nelson, 2010, Chapter 8; Chapter 9, pp. 295-309. Reading Reflection: Issue 2: Mark Charlton and Paul Barker, eds., Issue 6: “Is the Prime Minister too Powerful?” - debate between Hugh Mellon and Paul Barker, in Crosscurrents: Editor’s Choice, 7th ed. Toronto: Nelson, 2015. Due: October 2, 2020 at the beginning of class by 1:00 p.m. Recommended: Christopher Edward Taucar, Canadian Federalism and Quebec Sovereignty. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2000, pp. 204-5 (Departmentalized Cabinet, Institutionalized Cabinet). Taucar, Christopher Edward, The British System of Government and its Historical Development. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2014, re Constitutional Conventions - pp. 196-201, 214-16; re Responsible Government, Chapter 6, pp. 193, 198, 200-1; Chapter 7, pp. 208-9, 213, 215-6, 219-20, 224-5. IV PARLIAMENT (October 9) Heather MacIvor, Parameters of Power: Canada’s Political Institutions. Fifth edition. Toronto: Nelson, 2010, Chapter 7. Recommended: Taucar, Christopher Edward, The British System of Government and its Historical Development. Montreal and Kingston: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2014, Chapter 1, pp. 24-28, 42-5; Chapter 2 58-9; Chapter 3; Chapter 4; 109, 126-37; Chapters 6 and 7. Short Assignment due October 1, 2020 by the beginning of class at 1:00 p.m. MID-TERM TEST - October 16, 2020 – 1 hour (3:00 – 4:00 p.m.). Late penalty – 50% if late by up to 4:30 p.m. After that time, a mark of 0%. Mid-Term Test will be available on Moodle at 2:55 p.m., and will be emailed to Students through Moodle Announcements. If any student cannot access the test either by Moodle or by Announcements/email, the student must immediately email the Instructor at [email protected] Students may sign into the Online Class session for a descending clock so that they know how much time is available. Students are encouraged to save their work often because they are still responsible if their test is lost. Therefore, some additional time has been given, as well as to email the exam immediately afterward. Collaboration during exams is not permitted and is considered plagiarism. The exam must be received by 4:10 p.m. Pacific Standard Time (BC Time). All assignments should be in Word preferably or PDF allowing for comments. Upload your assignments to Moodle under the Home Tab and the corresponding Assignment. If you cannot upload a particular assignment to Moodle, email the assignment to [email protected] You should also email a backup copy. V FEDERALISM I: THE DIVISION OF JURISDICTION (October 23) Constitution Act, 1867, sections 91, 92, 93-95 and 109 found in the appendix of the MacIvor text. (Note the inspiration of sections 55 and 56 and of the references to “disallowance” and reservation in section 90. Christopher Edward Taucar, Canadian Federalism and Quebec Sovereignty. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2000, Chapter 8, pp. 135-146, pp. 149 (from Peace Order and Good Government: The Power) - 158. Heather MacIvor, Parameters of Power: Canada’s Political Institutions. Fifth edition. Toronto: Nelson, 2010, Chapter 4, 2 pages, pp. 86-7 (Judicial Review of the BNA Act), and 117-120 (Glossary of Key Terms) Essay Statement and Bibliography Due October 23, 2020 at the beginning of class by 1:00 p.m. VI FEDERALISM II: FINANCING THE FEDERATION (October 30) Christopher Edward Taucar, Canadian Federalism and Quebec Sovereignty. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2000, Chapter 9, pp. 159-180. Recommended: Christopher Edward Taucar, Canadian Federalism and Quebec Sovereignty. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2000, Chapter 11, pp. 203-207. Executive Federalism and the Institutionalized Cabinet VII CHARTER OF RIGHTS AND FREEDOMS (November 6) Heather MacIvor, Parameters of Power: Canada’s Political Institutions. Fifth edition. Toronto: Nelson, 2010, Chapter 6. Reading Break – November 13, 2020 (no class) VIII CANADIAN POLITICAL PARTIES (November 20) Heather MacIvor, Parameters of Power: Canada’s Political Institutions. Fifth edition. Toronto: Nelson, 2010, Chapter 11. IX ELECTIONS IN CANADA (November 27) Heather MacIvor, Parameters of Power: Canada’s Political Institutions. Fifth edition. Toronto: Nelson, 2010, Chapter 12. Reading Reflection: Issue 3: Mark Charlton and Paul Barker, eds., Issue 9 “Is a Mixed-Member Proportional Electoral System in Canada’s Interest,” in Crosscurrents: Editor’s Choice, 7th ed. Toronto: Nelson, 2015. Due: November 27, 2020 at the beginning of class by 1:00 p.m. Essay Due: November 27, 2020 at the beginning of class by 1:00 p.m. X PATRIATION, CONSTITUTIONAL REFORM AND THE SEARCH FOR UNITY (December 4) Christopher Edward Taucar, Canadian Federalism and Quebec Sovereignty. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2000, Chapters 4 (pp. 52-62) and 10. Reading Reflection: Issue 4: Christopher Edward Taucar, ch. 10 “The Process of Constitutional Change in Written Text,” Canadian Federalism and Quebec Sovereignty. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2000. Due: December 4, 2020 at the beginning of class by 1:00 p.m. Recommended: Christopher Edward Taucar, Canadian Federalism and Quebec Sovereignty. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2000, Chapter 4 (pp. 52-62) CONCLUSION (December 4) Overview, Leftover Matters, Conclusion and Exam Review FINAL TAKE HOME EXAM – Instructions to be provided on Moodle and Moodle Announcements [Show More]

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