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A-level ENGLISH LITERATURE B 7717/1A Paper 1A Literary genres: Aspects of tragedy

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nformation for examiners marking Aspects of tragedy: closed book Welcome to this mark scheme which is designed to help you deliver fair and accurate assessment. Please read all sections carefully a... nd ensure that you follow the requirements that they contain. The significance of closed book Examiners must understand that in marking a closed book exam there are examining implications. Students do not have their texts in front of them, so while it is expected that they will use quotations, it is also legitimate to use close textual references. They will have had to memorise quotations so there may be some errors which should not be over penalised. Detailed discussions of particular sections of texts are less likely here than in open book exams. Instead, students may range broadly across their texts as they construct their arguments. There are specific issues for AO2 – how meanings are shaped in texts. Students will not have their texts in front of them, so although they will be able to make specific references to structural and organisational issues, comments on other methods may be less specific. Arriving at Marks 1. All questions are framed to address all the Assessment Objectives (AOs). Answers are marked holistically. Examiners need to read the whole answer taking into account its strengths and weaknesses and then place it in the appropriate band. 2. Examiners should avoid making early snap judgements before the whole answer has been read. Some students begin tentatively but go on to make relevant points. 3. Examiners should be prepared to use the full mark range in order to discriminate and not ‘bunch’ scripts in the middle for safety. 4. Examiners should mark positively. Although the possible content of the mark scheme provides some indicators for what students are likely to write about, examiners should be willing to reward what is actually there – provided of course, that it is relevant to the question being asked. 5. Examiners should remember that there are no right answers. Students’ views which are relevant, well-argued and supported by appropriate textual evidence must receive credit whether the examiner agrees with the views or not. It is important to remain open to a student’s ideas which could be unusual or unorthodox. 6. Examiners should remember that length and quality are not synonymous. Some brief answers may be relevant and concise. Equally, long answers may be diffuse and repetitive. 7. If answers are short or incomplete, examiners can only reward what is there and assess accordingly. Some further credit can be given to answers finished in note form [Show More]

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