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RSSS 315 FA19 102 801: Final Exam Study Guide

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Module 1 • Baba Yaga fairy tales: identifying characteristics of her home, the two objects the cat gives the children, the reason why the animals/objects help the children, how to identify Baba Ya... ga • The Frog Princess: how the princes find their brides, the tests the king imposes on his daughters-in-law, how the Frog Princess is saved • Note: The short film “Jaga” will not appear on the test Module 2 • Katharina Wilson and the 4 possible origins for the word "vampire," as well as which of the 4 she identifies as the true origin. • Various roots / forms for the word "werewolf" in English, Greek, and Slavic (Russian, Serbian); the ways some of those words might intersect with the vampire; the cultural connection between shape-shifting and the bear in some cultures • "Werewolf of Husby", “Fox Hill” & “The Werewolf”: the country of origin of the tale, how one turns into a werewolf, what happens to the werewolf in each tale • Leptirica / The She-Butterfly: date, country of release, where the vampire lives, the role/meaning of the butterfly • The Wolfman (1941): title, year, and country of origin of the film; the name of the werewolf character (in the film); the name of the actor playing the werewolf character; how one turns into a werewolf in the film; the ultimate fate of the werewolf in the film RSSS 315 FA19 102 801: Final Exam Study Guide The final exam will consist of the following elements (100 points total): • Multiple Choice (60 points; 30 x 2 pts each): Choose the correct answer from the options, based on the question. • True/False (24 points; 12 x 2 pts each): Determine whether the given statement is true or false based on the class materials. • Take-Home Essay (16 points; 1 x 16 pts): Choose ONE of the given prompts (see below) and write a response of at least 250 words, making sure to have a clear introductory statement, evidence from the text(s) to support your opinion, and a final take-away. Essays should be uploaded to the d2l dropbox for grading. To prepare for the exam, please review the following and make sure you have the items in your notes for ready use during the test. If an item does is not referenced on the study guide, it will not appear on the test. Many of the items listed here appeared on the quizzes, but please review your notes, the lectures, and readings / films to make sure you can answer or discuss the various topics, people, characters, events, etc. Module 1 • Baba Yaga fairy tales: identifying characteristics of her home, the two objects the cat gives the children, the reason why the animals/objects help the children, how to identify Baba Yaga • The Frog Princess: how the princes find their brides, the tests the king imposes on his daughters-in-law, how the Frog Princess is saved • Note: The short film “Jaga” will not appear on the test Module 2 • Katharina Wilson and the 4 possible origins for the word "vampire," as well as which of the 4 she identifies as the true origin. • Various roots / forms for the word "werewolf" in English, Greek, and Slavic (Russian, Serbian); the ways some of those words might intersect with the vampire; the cultural connection between shape-shifting and the bear in some cultures • Slavic Paganism: Possible origins of the term “Slavs” for the ethnic group; who Perun & Veles were & what they represented; what "dvoeverie" is and at least one example of it from Old Slavic culture (see lecture slide). • Folk Tale Theory: Who Vladimir Propp was and his theory of the folktale; how many "functions" are in his theory (but not each individual function); the 4 "spheres" and their titles; the 7 character types and their role; the three other critical approaches to folktales and their primary authors/theorists that were highlighted in the lecture • Sava Savanovic: when, country of origin, signs of the vampire’s presence, the title & author of the 1880 novel based on folktales • "The Peasant and the Corpse": The object the peasant will not return until the vampire reveals his secret • "The Vampire": how Marusia is able to track the young man from the party, what object Marusia turns into after she dies, how Marusia is able to defeat the vampire. • "The Sorceress": what the young boy sees the princess do • "The Three Brothers": what the sister trades for, how the youngest brother "tracks" the sister; what animal kills the sister • "The Young Man and His Vampire Brother": why the vampire helps the young man, why the young man runs away from his bride, how the vampire "cures" the young man's bride. • "The She-Wolf": How the woman transforms into a wolf & how the soldier prevents her from transforming; how the son "rescues" the mother • "The Werewolf's Daughter": what the father does to his daughters, the ways the youngest daughter escapes from the father, how the father frames the daughter for a crime, how the father is defeated • "Werewolf of Husby", “Fox Hill” & “The Werewolf”: the country of origin of the tale, how one turns into a werewolf, what happens to the werewolf in each tale • Leptirica / The She-Butterfly: date, country of release, where the vampire lives, the role/meaning of the butterfly • The Wolfman (1941): title, year, and country of origin of the film; the name of the werewolf character (in the film); the name of the actor playing the werewolf character; how one turns into a werewolf in the film; the ultimate fate of the werewolf in the film Module 3 • The four types of Werewolves and their origins (i.e., punishment, demonic possession, etc.) • Lupercalia: Its date and origins • The key werewolf trials from St. Claude (France), their dates, and how the associations of the werewolf changed over time. • Peter Stubbe: the date and location of his death, how he transformed into a wolf, who helped him transform, how he was caught and executed • Old Thiess and the Benandanti - how they differ from other werewolves in history • Illnesses associated with Medical Werewolves • "The Epic of Gilgamesh": who Ishtar is, how she punished her lover • Ovid's Metamorphosis: who Lycaon is, why Lycaon was turned into a wolf • Volsung Saga: how/why Sigmund and Sinfjotli became wolves • Jan Perkowski's 4 Types of Vampires and their meaning; Perkowski's 10-point analysis • Peter Blagojevich: when, where, activities, signs on corpse that he was a vampire • The Vrykolakas: when, where, signs of the vampire's presence, cure • South-Slavic Vampires & The Lastovo Testimonies: the vampire's Origins (country and region), Precautions, Activities, Detection, and Cure • How the natural processes of decomposition and disease connect with the vampire, vampire folklore, and historical outbreaks • The general social/psychological roles of the vampire in the historical testimonies • Where the Balkans are; which country Transylvania is in • What Orientalism is, and the author / thinker that coined the term • Vlad III Dracula - date of birth, country and region associated with him, the origin / roots of the word "Dracula" • "The Story of Dracula: the date of Dracula's death, how Dracula supposedly died (according to this account), the "great sin" of Dracula, at least one example from the text of Dracula's cruelty, at least one example from the text of Dracula's sense of justice • Elizabeth Bathory: country, year of birth / death, why she was put on trial and how she was punished. • Cat People: date, country of release, where Irena (the protagonist) is from, what creature she turns into • Countess Dracula: date, country of release, who the Countess is based on (historically) Module 4 • Female Werewolves in folklore: types of werewolves, origins of the werewolf • Cesare Lombroso: who he was, the name of his book & year of publication, Lombroso’s “3 Types of Women”; characteristics of “the criminal woman” • The Were-Wolf: author, date, name of werewolf character, how the book contradicts Lombroso's theories • Angela Carter: dates, name of her 1979 collection of tales, name of the 1984 film adaptation of the book • Female werewolves in literature: comparisons / contrasts with male werewolves • Kathryn Hughes “Gender Roles in the 19th Century”: the Victorian ideology of “Separate Spheres”, a definition of a “bluestocking”; Victorian attitudes towards sex and sexuality • “Wolf Alice”: author, how Alica came to be raised by wolves, how / why Alice’s perception of self begins to change, what happens to the Duke • When Animals Dream: country of the film’s origin, year, name of the werewolf, signs of lycanthropy in the film, how the werewolf “resolves” her problems at the end of the film • "Viy": author, date, setting, name of lead character, what the lead character and the old woman do, how Viy "captures" the lead character the social/psychological role of the vampire in "Viy" • "Family of a Vourdalak": author, date, setting, social / psychological role of the vampire • The 3 sources of the English / Western literary vampire, when the word "vampire" enters the English dictionary, when vampire bats become known in the West, who Vuk Karadzic was • Lord Byron: date / title of literary work related to the vampire, date, name of the vampire • James Polidori: date / title of literary work related to the vampire, date, name of the vampire character (and who that character is based on), how Polidori's story is a pivotal transition • Varney the Vampyre: author, date, location, "cure," and social / psychological role • Carmilla: author, date, vampire hunter character's name, how Carmilla "hides" over the course of time, country / region the story takes place in, activity pattern of the vampire, “cure” that gets rid of the vampire, social / psychological role of the vampire in the story • The Hunger: date, what illness the film uses vampirism as a metaphor for (according to many) Module 5 • Dracula (the novel): author, date, key characters, "The New Woman" and its relation to the novel, "troeverie" and its connection with Van Helsing, how Dracula represents Orientalism, why Harker is in Translyvania, how Dracula gets to England & the name of the ship & the strange happenings connected with the ship, forms Dracula takes in his attacks on Lucy & Mina, Renfield (his illness, connection with Dracula, and ultimate fate), what happens to Lucy (& who kills her) and why, what happens to Mina and why, how/where/by whom Dracula is defeated • Dracula (the 1931 film): director, year of release, the name of the actor that plays Dracula Module 6 • Nosferatu: date, country of release, director, relationship to the novel Dracula, name of the vampire character, the vampire’s relationship to illness, pivotal feature of the film for the vampire tradition • Blacula: date, country of release, director, name of the vampire, W.E.B. DuBois and "double-consciousness", how Blacula is defeated, what “Blaxploitation” refers to in cinema • Psychic vampires: qualities, The Blood of the Vampire (date, author, country and relationship to psychic vampire, Victorian-Era themes raised in the novel) • "Luella Miller": author, date, attributes / activity pattern of the vampire, Lydia Anderson • Transformation scenes: points of emphasis in transformation scenes, 1888 event connected with the theme of “transformation” • Luna: Country of film’s origin, year Module 7 • Let the Right One In: date, country of release, name of the vampire, who Oskar is and how he develops a relationship with Eli, who Hakan is and his ultimate fate, how Eli helps Oskar and their ultimate fate in the film • Ginger Snaps: date, country of release, names of the two sisters, connection of shape-shifting with adolescence / "body horror", Ginger’s ultimate fate • The respective social classes the werewolf and vampire are generally connected to • Vampire and economics: How/Why Marx & Engels connect capitalism to the vampire, what is "dead" labor v. "living" labor • "Girl with the Hungry Eyes": date, author, country of release, how the vampire feeds / is active, ways in which the Girl is a larger metaphor for advertising / capitalism • Transformation: Ways in which the werewolf / monster is a metaphor for “body horror” and the changes of adolescence Module 8 • Genre: definition of, types of (restricted v. free), a definition for “post-modernism” • "A Werewolf Problem in Central Russia": date, author, country of release, use of Russian folklore in the story (Rusalka, Leshii, Nightingale the Robber) and their attributes, connections between Bolsheviks & the wolf, how Sasha becomes a werewolf • Vampire Hunters & Hybrids: 4 Tasks of Van Helsing & how they compare with modern vampire hunters like Blade or Buffy • Blade: date, country of release, how Blade (generally) suppresses his desire to drink blood, how Blade defeats the main vampire • Santo v. the She-Wolves: date, country of release, who El Santo is and why he is important in Mexican cultural history, how he defeats the King & Queen of the werewolves • What We Do In the Shadows: date, country of release, which vampire dies and how, what happens to Stu, who "The Beast" is, what types of vampires the 4 original vampires represent • Fandom: definition, how fandom responds to and informs cultural conceptions of art • Henry Jenkins: what fandom studies are, definitions of convergence culture; media convergence; what participatory culture is; positives and negatives of fandom culture Essay Topics. In addition to the multiple-choice / true-false section, you will need to write a response to any ONE of the essay topics listed below. Essays should be at least 250 words long and include a word count; be sure you have some sort of introductory statement and final take-away in your responses as well. Upload your essay to the d2l dropbox at some point after 12:01am Monday Dec 9 but by no later than 11:59pm Monday, Dec 16. No late essays will be accepted for credit. • Topic 1. The scholar Chantal Bourgault Du Coudray writes, “like other Gothic monsters, the werewolf has been thoroughly constructed as an alien ‘other’ threatening society; [the werewolf is] the negative of a normalized social identity” (Curse of the Werewolf 50). Agree or disagree with this statement, noting in what ways the werewolf and vampire have become a means to express humanity’s fears of “others” (broadly understood). In your essay, use evidence from at least three works (texts or films) from the course materials this semester to support your opinion. You must include at least one example (each) of a werewolf and a vampire, you may not write about only one monster. • Topic 2. Caitlin Giacopasi writes that “beyond the restrictions of humanity, the werewolf could publicly act and desire in ways which the average man could only dream. […] The refusal to accept a gender role and the inability to embrace a sexuality mark the monster” (“The Werewolf Pride Movement” 5-6). Discuss the way(s) in which the werewolf and vampire break or complicate traditional gender roles and/or sexual identity based on what we have seen in the course materials this semester. In your essay, discuss at least three works (texts or films) from the course materials this semester. You must include at least one example (each) of a werewolf and a vampire, you may not write about only one monster. • Topic 3. Jeffrey Cohen writes that "fear of the monster is really a kind of desire." What is it about the vampire / werewolf that has captivated human imagination for centuries? How can we explain our fascination with these monstrous and (often) repulsive figures? In your essay, use evidence from at least three works (texts or films) from the course materials this semester to support your opinion. You must include at least one example (each) of a werewolf and a vampire, you may not write about only one monster. [Show More]

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